Holy Love: The Eunuch Revelation

In my book ‘Holy Love’ I offer an affirmative theology for LGBTQ+ people, and an advocacy for their full inclusion in the church. [1] In the book, I wrote a bit about eunuchs, but since then I have found the biblical message concerning them to be a key revelation for being an ally with LGBTQ+ people. This article is an expansion of what I wrote in the book.

We have a multiple-word vocabulary for talking about gender and sexual orientation. [2] The natural and behavioral sciences help us to recognize the nonbinary nature of our sexuality. Interestingly, the Bible recognizes it, not only in the first creation story [3], but also in the word eunuch. It was the catch-all word for people who were not male or female. Today, we would say people who are transgender or intersex. So, the fact is, Scripture confirms the reality of nonbinary sexuality, and that in itself is significant. But that’s only the beginning.

We move from general revelation into the teaching of Jesus, who referred to eunuchs in Matthew 19:12, noting that some of them are born that way. It’s another indication that people in Bible times knew about transgender and intersex persons. The fact that Jesus speaks about eunuchs in a positive way adds additional weight to the reality and worth of nonbinary persons. But where did Jesus get this positive regard? He got it from the Hebrew Bible, Isaiah 56:4-5, and these verses are what I am calling “the eunuch revelation”—the primary window through which we can look to see the full humanity (imago dei) of LGBTQ+ people and to advocate for their full inclusion in the Church. God, speaking through the prophet, tells us some important things about eunuchs, about nonbinary people.

First, they are not abnormal. They must not think of themselves as such, as a “dry tree.” They are not disordered in their nature. They are not aberrations in God’s design. They are fully human, existing along the spectrum between maleness and femaleness.

Second, they are included in the Covenant and can keep it like anyone else. They do not have to sublimate their sexuality (e.g. lifelong celibacy) or undergo “conversion therapy” into heterosexual maleness or femaleness. They are only asked to honor the Covenant like everyone else—ordering their sexuality to reflect sacredness, fidelity, permanency, and monogamy. [4] This means there is one standard for sexual morality, and all people can manifest it.

Third, they are honored. We erect monuments to those whom we esteem. Eunuchs are given monuments in the temple (religion) and on the city walls (society). Here’s an indication they had ecclesial and civil rights and were respected throughout the culture.

These three things are a lot to commend nonbinary people, but there is a fourth revelation which cinches the case for equality in human sexuality: they are given a name better than sons and daughters. Don’t miss the words “better than.” They are a game-changer, showing from Scripture that males (sons) and females (daughters) do not encompass the totality of sexuality.

We have to step outside of contemporary Christianity to grasp the significance of “better than.” We can understand it by looking at Native American cultures and their concept of two-spirit people. In most tribes, they were considered neither men nor women; they occupied a distinct, alternative gender status. They were seen as particularly spiritual, given they lived beyond binary sexuality. They were honored in the tribe, often serving as wisdom teachers and spiritual guides, and expressing themselves through the arts. They lived as both single and married persons, with the same rights and privileges as everyone else.[5]

This understanding of the nonbinary spectrum of human sexuality illustrates the biblical view. The imposition of binary views onto the scriptural text (increasingly by interpreting the Bible through the lens of European cultural norms) has caused us to misread the first creation story, to fail to see Jesus’ affirmation of nonbinary sexuality, and to overlook the revolutionary story that comes to us through the eunuch revelation.

But things are changing. A growing number of Christians who affirm the inspiration and authority of Scripture are using their hermeneutical skills to mine the passages regarding human sexuality, bringing from them the message summed up in Paul’s words, “Christ is all, and in all” (Colossians 3:11). The eunuch revelation is a pivotal piece of this message.

[1] Steve Harper, ‘Holy Love: A Biblical Theology for Human Sexuality’ (Abingdon Press,2019). I wrote an earlier book, ‘For the Sake of the Bride’ (Abingdon Press, 2014) that both announced my becoming an ally with LGBTQ+ people and proposed that the move into full inclusion would be a strengthening of the Church.

[2] Some articles offer eight orientation words and fifty gender diversity ones. Our vocabulary increases as our learnings advance.

[3] ‘Holy Love,’ 15-20.

[4] ‘Holy Love,’ 20-23

[5] “Two Spirit,” is an article on the Indian Health Service website. Related to this Sister José Hobday, a Franciscan sister who was also a Native American Seneca woman once told Matthew Fox, “People like myself who know our traditions before the white people came to our shores know that all the spiritual directors to our great chiefs were gay. We know that gay people bring more spirituality to a community than straight people do.” (Matthew Fox, Daily Meditations, 3/19/21). Her words further interpret the “better than’ name given to eunuchs in Isaiah 56.

About Steve Harper

Retired seminary professor, who taught for 32 years in the disciplines of Spiritual Formation and Wesley Studies. Author and co-author of 42 books. Also a retired Elder in The Florida Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church.
This entry was posted in Holy Love. Bookmark the permalink.