Category Archives: Followership

Followership: We Follow a Person

E. Stanley Jones helped me a long time ago to recognize that we follow a Person, not a principle or a philosophy.  We follow Jesus. Unfortunately, some quarters in Christianity put more emphasis upon rules and regulations than upon relationships.  … Continue reading

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Followership: Unique, But Not Isolated

When we step upon the “way,” we find ourselves entering into a personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ.  Sweet says, “We walk along the unique path that is our one and only life” (p. 65).  Jesus has no desire … Continue reading

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Followership: An Emerging Reality

If Jesus was indeed identifying himself with the Eastern understanding of Reality of “way” in somewhat the same manner that the Western mind understood it as “word,” then the disciples must have been utterly amazed and greatly encouraged. This makes … Continue reading

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Followership: Jesus as Way

Jesus’ choice of the word “way” is most likely his way of  responding to Thomas’ question, where the same word was used to frame the question, “How can we know the way?” But it should not escape our attention that … Continue reading

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Followership: On the Way

After challenging his readers to lay down the largely-secular model of the “CEO Christian leader,” Sweet turns his attention directly to Jesus, interpreting his statement, “I am the way, the truth, and the life” in the bulk of his book. … Continue reading

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Followership: Not Always Easy (3)

Sweet ends his exploration of the challenges that attend true followership by commenting on the courage to take moral action… Most everyone reading this book has both witnessed and heard stories ad nauseam of pastors and Christian leaders who behave … Continue reading

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Followership: Not Always Easy (2)

Sweet continues to explore the challenges that attend being a true follower…. Leadership-centric cultures tend to create protective force fields around top-dogs.  Their attitudes and character, unseen from the pulpit and concealed in the foyer, are off-limits to underlings.  But … Continue reading

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